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Archive for the ‘Worship’ Category

This is a letter not to a specific worship leader but to any and all worships leaders who do the things listed below. It seems that worship leaders in many, or even perhaps most, evangelical churches have bought into the lie that they have to conduct worship in a certain way in order to attract people or get more attenders in the worship service.

The first area of confusion is this: Worship leaders think that the singing and music are the main part of worship. In fact, this fallacy is so ubiquitous that some people use the words “worship” and “music” interchangeably. But, in reality the main part of worship is the preaching of the Word and rightly dividing and applying Scripture. The music prepares our hearts for worship and helps us to corporately lift up the name of Christ and focus on His attributes and give Him praise, but the central part of worship is the preaching of the Word.

Getting to the music, I urge you to stop doing these things if you are the worship leader.

STOP leading us in music that that repeats lines over and over in order to work us up into a state of emotion. Stop trying to manipulate my emotions with the music. Stop making us sing the same lines over and over while building in volume and tempo and drums in order musically manipulate my emotions. Don’t try to work me up into a state where I will “Amen” anything you have to say just because I am all emotional (rather than actually engaging my mind) due to the music and manipulation.

STOP making the music so loud that I have to yell at people when I greet them. The music does not have to be over 100dB for us to hear it. It doesn’t have to be that loud for us to praise God. Do you have the music so loud because the congregational singing is horrible or because you are trying to simulate a music concert? Please don’t feel the need to simulate a music concert in order to attract people to church. It is a service of worship. The point is to praise and lift up the name of Christ. We worship in Spirit and in Truth, not in overwhelming loudness and in the dark.

STOP turning the lights down during worship. Again, it is not a concert. We are there to worship Christ. It doesn’t need to be dark in order to attract me to come. Worship is for the believer. Evangelism is done for the unbeliever. Please stop focusing on the environment to draw people in.

STOP singing about fluff and emotional psychobabble. We don’t need any more Hillsong or Bethel Redding music. Honestly, the music we sing from Hillsong could be sung by nearly any theological liberal or universalist church because it just lacks substance. It lacks doctrine. It lacks specific biblical truth that nourishes the Christians’ soul. One thing that this music doesn’t lack is musical emotional manipulation.

I urge you, the worship leaders, to start doing the things listed below.

START engaging my mind with your music selection. You must go through my mind to reach my heart to reach my emotions. My emotions won’t be stirred or manipulated by music. Engage my mind with doctrinally sound lyrics. Christ communicates to us through words. Words communicate truth. Emotions do not.

START reminding me of Christ and the Gospel when we are singing during worship. Remind me about how I was an enemy of Christ but He made a way for me to be reconciled to Him. Remind me of how I was under God’s wrath but Christ took the punishment for me so God’s justice could be satisfied. I don’t need any more of the “God’s presence is sweeping me off my feet because He loves me” music. It is not wrong. It is incomplete and a steady diet of it creates a church of theologically illiterate people.

START signing songs that do not have theologically inaccurate statements. You can say I’m being picky. I say words carry meaning so choose words carefully to communicate an accurate meaning. People sing songs throughout the week in their heads. Don’t pick songs that have bad theology. People will be repeating bad theology in their heads all week.

Jesus said, “But an hour is coming, and now is, when the true worshippers will worship the Father in spirit and truth, for such people the Father seeks to be His worshippers. God is spirit, and those who worship must worship in spirit and truth.” (John 4:23-24 NASB) I know that the worship leaders truly want to lead us into worship. I know they take their job seriously and want us to worship in spirit and truth. However, in most evangelical churches that I have visited worship in spirit, emotion, and very shallow truth and with very little doctrinally informed truth. May our worship leaders use their influence to teach Christians solid doctrine through the music selection.

Soli Deo Gloria

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It is the weekend leading up to Independence Day which means it is that time of year again.  It is time for the church worship service to go patriotic.  We can expect to see special patriotic music, flag ceremonies, or times set aside to honor those who serve in our military. It is, after all, the birthday of our great nation and we have much to celebrate, not the least of which are the freedoms we enjoy and the men and women who have sacrificially given their lives so that we can enjoy this freedom.

This morning we went to the house of worship where the my church gathers for corporate worship on this weekend before Independence Day. Our worship started off with a patriotic song which was spectacularly performed by the choir and orchestra. This song received a standing ovation and everyone remained standing as we joined in for the Pledge of Allegiance. After the pledge, the entire assembly sang our national anthem. There was a thunderous applause for the patriotism and then we sat down for the continuation of the worship service.

I love our country. I appreciate the men and women of our armed forces and I think there is much to be celebrated about our country. I am thankful that my citizenship is in this country. There is much about our culture in this present day that is concerning but we have great freedoms in this country which is to be celebrated. Many people the world over are envious of people who have the privilege of being citizens of our country. Having said that, I take the position that the pledge and the celebration of our country should happen in the context of civic celebration events but not in the context of Christian worship. I love to watch Pops Goes the Fourth but I don’t love to see those songs sung in church.

I have taken this position because of what I understand to be corporate worship in the context of the local church. The church is coming together for the sake of the community of saints but primarily to worship and exalt the Lord Jesus Christ. We are there to exalt the King of Kings and Lord of Lords. We are there to praise the creator of the universe.  (Of course, the centerpiece of worship is the exposition of the Word of God, but that is a subject for another post.) With this understanding of Christian worship, these are the reasons that I think that patriotic songs and the Pledge of Allegiance do not belong in our church worship services.

  1. The Pledge of Allegiance.  This is the easiest issue to point out. While we do pledge our allegiance to our nation on a temporal level, we pledge our allegiance to God on an eternal level. We follow our civic authorities until they conflict with God’s commands. We are at church to worship the God of the universe. What are we doing pledging our allegiance to a lesser authority when we are there to praise God Himself.
  2. Why do we praise God? God has blessed his people in many ways. The blessings of God are not measured in material ways but in spiritual ways. We are blessed to live in America. There is no doubt about that but is that why we worship God or do we worship because of the gift of His Son, His Spirit, and the Gospel? The Gospel is far greater than the privilege of living in the USA. This is why people can gather in places like North Korea and still worship and know that they are blessed by God.
  3. What about internationals? God is moving around the world and is bringing people around the world to our doorsteps. Hopefully your church is trying to reach internationals. What do you think that your international guests think about your patriotic celebration in church? Would they think it is appropriate to be pledging allegiance to the USA in a service of worship to the creator of the universe. They would probably shudder at doing that in a worship service in their home country. They may wonder why worship to God includes allegiance being pledged to a country.
  4. God is calling people from all nations. The United States of America is not God’s chosen nation.  God is calling people from all tribes, tongues, and nations into His church. Our God is a God who will be worshipped by all nations. That is what the story of history is about according to Genesis 12.
  5. It causes people to confuse spiritual blessing with material blessing. We are blessed to have freedom in this country that other around the world don’t have. Celebrating that freedom makes people think that the greatest freedom which God has given us is the freedoms we enjoy as citizens of America. What happens when those freedoms disappear? People will blame God because he is the author of those freedoms. But the real blessings we enjoy are enjoyed by Christians around the world and many of them are experiencing intense persecution.  We can face intense persecution and still be immensely blessed by God. We celebrate the gift of Christ and the gospel which is not limited to people in free nations. Celebrating the freedoms in America in church worship is the first step towards the slippery slope of the prosperity gospel.

There is much more to be said but I will cut this off here. What are your thoughts on this issue? Does your church do a patriotic service? Do you feel comfortable with it?

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There has been much made lately on youth leaving the church. I subscribe to a lot of podcasts where this has been a topic of conversation. This is not a conversation among just Calvinists or just Arminians but is a conversation that is taking place among Evangelicals of all stripes. There is apparently some kind of data, collected by someone like Barna, that supports this position. What the experts are saying is that American Evanglicals who are active in church as a youth have a tendency to leave the church once they graduate from high school, leave home, and go to college.

I am someone who was part of church youth in high school and left home to go to college and remained in the church. I experienced college as someone who was part of a local church and am still part of a local body of believers today. I now have children who are youth-aged. In fact, I am a parent of multiple teenagers. (Feel free to pray for me. I need it.) I sit watching the youth of our day praying that I don’t screw up as a parent and that my kids will have faith in Christ that will be their own and that their faith will continue to grow into adulthood and that they would be committed lifelong disciples of Christ.

What I see from so many youth today is that they are not part of the church as young people. Their parents take them to church and drop them off with the youth group. They hang out with a bunch of youth at church. They have Sunday School with their peers — which is positive since they are all experiencing the challenges of transitioning from childhood to adulthood. While at the youth group, they usually sit around on comfortable sofas because we all know that NOBODY would come if they had to sit in uncomfortable straight back chairs (gasp)! They listen to relevant music and not that boring stuff their parents listen to. And often times, they sit around and complain about how they are not respected because of their youth all the while remaining in their youth cocoon. After Sunday School, or Bible Study, they head off to the worship center for Sunday morning worship. And guess who they sit with during worship? That’s right: they sit with youth. After worship, they find their parents and ask to go eat lunch with the their friends in the youth.

On Sunday night often times the youth have their own get together for more fellowship and study — separate from adults. On Wednesday nights they are with the youth again. They may even have some other get-together on Friday or Saturday because there isn’t enough youth fellowship time already. Yes, I am being a bit sarcastic here.

So, I’ve mentioned four meetings at church: Sunday School, worship, Sunday evening, and Wednesday evening. How many of those times do the youth at your church integrate with the church body and how many times are they with just the youth? Your answer is probably that the youth are with just youth about 75% or 100% of the time, if your church is like most American churches. If this is the case, how can we say that’s youth are leaving the church? I don’t think we can say that. I submit to you that youth are not leaving the church. I say that they were never part of the church–at least not while they were in the youth group. What they were part of during their youth years was a para-church group called “the youth ministry” but were not really part of the local church. If your church is like this, here are some critical things that your young person is missing out on.

1. First and foremost, they are missing out on worshiping with their family — particularly their mom and dad. They need to see that mom and dad are serious about worship and that they are there to worship God; not just to take their kid to the youth group. They need to see that mom and dad take the sermon seriously by taking notes and not texting and checking Facebook during the preaching.

2. They miss out on the inter-generational nature of the body of Christ. By being with youth all the time they are hanging out with those who are facing similar problems. That is true. But why not hang out (sometimes) with people who have already experienced those problems and have come through them? Why not learn lessons from people who can encourage youth as examples of those who have been through those tumultuous years?

3. They miss out on opportunities to serve and to be the body of Christ. To be part of the church they should be plugged in. They have no right to complain about being disrespected by adults due to their age if they aren’t trying to plug in and serve. Let us not encourage our youth to be spiritual navel gazers but people who are committed to building up the body of Christ by serving!

So, why shouldn’t youth drop out of church when they go to college. They don’t know what it is like to be part of the church and how beautiful the bride of Christ really is. Don’t misunderstand me. Teenagers need teenage friends. They need to know how to build friendships and develop relationships and hold each other accountable in the Lord. However, I don’t think that their relationships should be limited to those with peers. I am praying for a change in the church youth culture and that this change would take place before all of the youth that were never in the church leave the church.

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